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Call #
B BRATTON
Descript.
495 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 25 cm
text txt rdacontent
unmediated n rdamedia
volume nc rdacarrier
Note
Includes index.
Summary
"When Bill Bratton became a Boston street cop after returning from serving in Vietnam, he was dismayed by the corrupt old guard , and it is fair to say the old guard was dismayed by him too. But his success fighting crime could not be denied. Propelled by extraordinary results, Bratton had a dazzling rise, and ultimately a dazzling career, becoming the most famous police commissioner of modern times. The Profession is the story of that career in full. Everywhere he went, Bratton brought his revolutionary data-driven approach and extraordinary leadership skills to bear to slash crime rates and professionalize the vocation of the cop. But his career has not been without controversy, and central to the reckoning of The Profession is the fundamental crisis of relations between the Black community and law enforcement, a crisis he now believes has been inflamed by the unforeseen consequences of some well-intentioned policies. Crime exacts a terrible cost on us, but so can punishment. Building trust between a police force and the community it is sworn to protect is in many ways, Bratton argues, the first task--without genuine trust in law enforcement to do the right thing, little else is possible. The Profession is both a searching examination of the path of policing over the past fifty years, for good and also for ill, and a master class in transformative leadership. Bill Bratton was never brought into a police department to maintain the status quo; wherever he went, from the New York Transit Police in the 80's to Los Angeles after Rodney King to New York again in the era of unchecked stop and frisk, root and branch reinvention was the order of the day, and he met the challenge. There are few other positions on earth in which life-and-death stakes combine with intense public scrutiny and turbulent political cross-winds as they do for the police chief of a major American city. Now more than ever, when the role of the police in society is under a microscope like never before, and for good reasons, Bill Bratton's authority on the subject of improving law enforcement is profoundly useful. The Profession presents not only a fascinating and colorful life at the heights of law enforcement leadership, but the vision for the future of American policing that we sorely need"-- Provided by publisher.
Subject
Alt Author
Knobler, Peter.
ISBN/ISSN
9780525558194 (hardcover)
0525558195 (hardcover)
Call #
363.2 M
Edition
First American edition.
Descript.
iv, 242 pages ; 24 cm.
text txt rdacontent.
unmediated n rdamedia.
volume nc rdacarrier.
Note
Includes index.
Contents
The policing revolution, crime, and the anti-law-enforcement movement -- Burning cities and the Ferguson effect. Obama's Ferguson sellout ; Ferguson's unasked questions ; Finding meaning in Ferguson ; Justice is blind ; De-policing New York ; The big lie of the anti-cop left turns lethal ; Baltimore in flames ; The riot show! ; The new nationwide crime wave ; Explaining away the new crime wave ; America's legal order begins to fray ; The Ferguson effect is real ; Black and unarmed behind the numbers -- Handcuffing the cops. Targeting the police ; Courts v. cops ; The great stop-and-frisk fraud -- The truth about crime. Chicago's real crime story ; Running with the predators -- Incarceration and its critics. Is the criminal-justice system racist? ; The jail inferno ; California's prison-litigation nightmare ; The decriminalization delusion.
Summary
It has been call the "Ferguson effect": Since the 2014 police shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, officers have been backing off of proactive policing, and criminals are becoming emboldened. Mac Donald deconstructs the central narrative of the Black Lives Matter movement: that racist cops are the greatest threat to young black males. She argues that it is criminals and gangbangers who are responsible for the high black homicide death rate; and that no government agency is more dedicated to the proposition that "black lives matter" than today's data-driven, accountable police department.
Subject
ISBN/ISSN
9781594038754 (hardcover)
1594038759 (hardcover)
Call #
364.4 S
Descript.
viii, 413 p. ; 24 cm.
Bibliog.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents
Introduction: the rule of too much law -- Crime and punishment -- Two migrations -- "The wolf by the ear" -- The past -- Ideals and institutions -- The Fourteenth Amendment's failed promise -- Criminal justice in the gilded age -- A culture war and its aftermath -- Constitutional law's rise, three roads not taken -- Earl Warren's errors -- The rise and fall of crime, the fall and rise of criminal punishment -- The future -- Fixing a broken system -- Epilogue: taming the wolf -- Note on sources and citation form.
Summary
The rule of law has vanished in America's criminal justice system. Prosecutors now decide whom to punish and how severely. Almost no one accused of a crime will ever face a jury. Inconsistent policing, rampant plea bargaining, overcrowded courtrooms, and ever more draconian sentencing have produced a gigantic prison population, with black citizens the primary defendants and victims of crime. In this passionately argued book, the leading criminal law scholar of his generation looks to history for the roots of these problems -- and for their solutions. The Collapse of American Criminal Justice takes us deep into the dramatic history of American crime -- bar fights in nineteenth-century Chicago, New Orleans bordellos, Prohibition, and decades of murderous lynching. Digging into these crimes and the strategies that attempted to control them, Stuntz reveals the costs of abandoning local democratic control. The system has become more centralized, with state legislators and federal judges given increasing power. The liberal Warren Supreme Court's emphasis on procedures, not equity, joined hands with conservative insistence on severe punishment to create a system that is both harsh and ineffective. What would get us out of this Kafkaesque world? More trials with local juries; laws that accurately define what prosecutors seek to punish; and an equal protection guarantee like the one that died in the 1870s, to make prosecution and punishment less discriminatory. Above all, Stuntz eloquently argues, Americans need to remember again that criminal punishment is a necessary but terrible tool, to use effectively, and sparingly. - Publisher.
Subject
ISBN/ISSN
9780674051751
0674051750
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