Results for Police brutality.
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Call #
YA 363.232 P
Descript.
160 p. ; 27 cm.
Series
Bibliog.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 155-156) and index.
Summary
An anthology presenting various articles debating whether police brutality is a national crisis, what its causes are, and how it can be stopped, and a case study of police brutality.
Subject
Alt Author
Dudley, William, 1964-
ISBN/ISSN
0899085806 (lib. bdg. : recycled paper)
0899085865 (pbk.)
Descript.
1 online resource
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Summary
A shockingly powerful exploration of the lasting impact of prejudice and the indomitable spirit of sisterhood that will have readers questioning what it truly means to be an ally, from sister-writer duo Maika Moulite and Maritza Moulite, authors of Dear Haiti, Love Alaine. ISN'T BEING HUMAN ENOUGH? When teen social activist and history buff Kezi Smith is killed under mysterious circumstances after attending a social justice rally, her devastated sister Happi and their family are left reeling in the aftermath. As Kezi becomes another immortalized victim in the fight against police brutality, Happi begins to question the idealized way her sister is remembered. Perfect. Angelic. One of the good ones. Even as the phrase rings wrong in her mind—why are only certain people deemed worthy to be missed?—Happi and her sister Genny embark on a journey to honor Kezi in their own way, using an heirloom copy of The Negro Motorist Green Book as their guide. But there's a twist to Kezi's story that no one could've ever expected—one that will change everything all over again. Praise for the Moulites' debut novel, Dear Haiti, Love Alaine "I couldn't put Dear Haiti, Love Alaine down!" —New York Times bestselling author Jasmine Guillory "An enchanting and engrossing novel full of wit and laughter." —Edwidge Danticat, author of Breath, Eyes, Memory "Remarkable, funny, and whip-smart." —Ibi Zoboi, author of American Street, National Book Award finalist "Maika and Maritza Moulite have created quite the masterpiece." —NPR.org "Alaine's sarcastic quips...are worth the price of admission alone." —HYPEBAE "A beautiful story from start to finish." —Buzzfeed
Reproduction
Electronic reproduction. Toronto, Ontario : Inkyard Press, 2021. Requires OverDrive Read (file size: N/A KB) or Adobe Digital Editions (file size: 1971 KB) or Kobo app or compatible Kobo device (file size: N/A KB) or Amazon Kindle (file size: N/A KB).
Subject
Genre
ISBN/ISSN
9781488076220 (electronic bk)
Descript.
1 online resource
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Summary
"[A] groundbreaking, deeply researched and profoundly heart-rending account of the origins of our national crisis of police violence against Black America." —Peniel Joseph, New York Times Book Review From one of our top historians, a groundbreaking story of policing and "riots" that shatters our understanding of the post–civil rights era. What began in spring 2020 as local protests in response to the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police quickly exploded into a massive nationwide movement. Millions of mostly young people defiantly flooded into the nation's streets, demanding an end to police brutality and to the broader, systemic repression of Black people and other people of color. To many observers, the protests appeared to be without precedent in their scale and persistence. Yet, as the acclaimed historian Elizabeth Hinton demonstrates in America on Fire, the events of 2020 had clear precursors—and any attempt to understand our current crisis requires a reckoning with the recent past. Even in the aftermath of Donald Trump, many Americans consider the decades since the civil rights movement in the mid-1960s as a story of progress toward greater inclusiveness and equality. Hinton's sweeping narrative uncovers an altogether different history, taking us on a troubling journey from Detroit in 1967 and Miami in 1980 to Los Angeles in 1992 and beyond to chart the persistence of structural racism and one of its primary consequences, the so-called urban riot. Hinton offers a critical corrective: the word riot was nothing less than a racist trope applied to events that can only be properly understood as rebellions—explosions of collective resistance to an unequal and violent order. As she suggests, if rebellion and the conditions that precipitated it never disappeared, the optimistic story of a post–Jim Crow United States no longer holds. Black rebellion, America on Fire powerfully illustrates, was born in response to poverty and exclusion, but most immediately in reaction to police violence. In 1968, President Lyndon Johnson launched the "War on Crime," sending militarized police forces into impoverished Black neighborhoods. Facing increasing surveillance and brutality, residents threw rocks and Molotov cocktails at officers, plundered local businesses, and vandalized exploitative institutions. Hinton draws on exclusive sources to uncover a previously hidden geography of violence in smaller American cities, from York, Pennsylvania, to Cairo, Illinois, to Stockton, California. The central lesson from these eruptions—that police violence invariably leads to community violence—continues to escape policymakers, who respond by further criminalizing entire groups instead of addressing underlying socioeconomic causes. The results are the hugely expanded policing and prison regimes that shape the lives of so many Americans today. Presenting a new framework for understanding our nation's enduring strife, America on Fire is also a warning: rebellions will surely continue unless police are no longer called on to manage the consequences of dismal conditions beyond their control, and until an oppressive system is finally remade on the principles of justice and equality.
Reproduction
Electronic reproduction. New York : Liveright, 2021. Requires OverDrive Read (file size: N/A KB) or Adobe Digital Editions (file size: 12596 KB) or Kobo app or compatible Kobo device (file size: N/A KB) or Amazon Kindle (file size: N/A KB).
Subject
Genre
ISBN/ISSN
9781631498916 (electronic bk)
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