Results for Wealth.
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Descript.
1 online resource
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Summary
A groundbreaking exposé of racism in the American taxation system from a law professor and expert on tax policy “Important reading for those who want to understand how inequality is built into the bedrock of American society, and what a more equitable future might look like.”—Ibram X. Kendi, #1  New York Times  bestselling author of  How to Be an Antiracist Dorothy A. Brown became a tax lawyer to get away from race. As a young black girl growing up in the South Bronx, she’d seen how racism limited the lives of her family and neighbors. Her law school classes offered a refreshing contrast: Tax law was about numbers, and the only color that mattered was green. But when Brown sat down to prepare tax returns for her parents, she found something strange: James and Dottie Brown, a plumber and a nurse, seemed to be paying an unusually high percentage of their income in taxes. When Brown became a law professor, she set out to understand why. In The Whiteness of Wealth , Brown draws on decades of cross-disciplinary research to show that tax law isn’t as color-blind as she’d once believed. She takes us into her adopted city of Atlanta, introducing us to families across the economic spectrum whose stories demonstrate how American tax law rewards the preferences and practices of white people while pushing black people further behind. From attending college to getting married to buying a home, black Americans find themselves at a financial disadvantage compared to their white peers. The results are an ever-increasing wealth gap and more black families shut out of the American dream. Solving the problem will require a wholesale rethinking of America’s tax code. But it will also require both black and white Americans to make different choices. This urgent, actionable book points the way forward.
Reproduction
Electronic reproduction. New York : Crown, 2021. Requires OverDrive Read (file size: N/A KB) or Adobe Digital Editions (file size: 2026 KB) or Kobo app or compatible Kobo device (file size: N/A KB) or Amazon Kindle (file size: N/A KB).
Subject
Genre
ISBN/ISSN
9780525577348 (electronic bk)
Edition
Unabridged.
Descript.
1 online resource (7 audio files) : digital
Time
07:15:49
Descript.
spoken word spw rdacontent
audio s rdamedia
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
audio file rda
Note
Unabridged.
Performer
Narrator: Karen Murray.
Summary
A groundbreaking exposé of racism in the American taxation system from a law professor and expert on tax policy “Important reading for those who want to understand how inequality is built into the bedrock of American society, and what a more equitable future might look like.”—Ibram X. Kendi, #1  New York Times  bestselling author of  How to Be an Antiracist Dorothy A. Brown became a tax lawyer to get away from race. As a young black girl growing up in the South Bronx, she’d seen how racism limited the lives of her family and neighbors. Her law school classes offered a refreshing contrast: Tax law was about numbers, and the only color that mattered was green. But when Brown sat down to prepare tax returns for her parents, she found something strange: James and Dottie Brown, a plumber and a nurse, seemed to be paying an unusually high percentage of their income in taxes. When Brown became a law professor, she set out to understand why. In The Whiteness of Wealth , Brown draws on decades of cross-disciplinary research to show that tax law isn’t as color-blind as she’d once believed. She takes us into her adopted city of Atlanta, introducing us to families across the economic spectrum whose stories demonstrate how American tax law rewards the preferences and practices of white people while pushing black people further behind. From attending college to getting married to buying a home, black Americans find themselves at a financial disadvantage compared to their white peers. The results are an ever-increasing wealth gap and more black families shut out of the American dream. Solving the problem will require a wholesale rethinking of America’s tax code. But it will also require both black and white Americans to make different choices. This urgent, actionable book points the way forward.
System Det
Requires OverDrive Listen (file size: N/A KB) or OverDrive app (file size: 204320 KB).
Subject
Genre
Alt Author
Murray, Karen.
ISBN/ISSN
9780593340073 (sound recording)
Call #
343.7304089 B
Edition
First edition.
Descript.
279 pages ; 22 cm
text txt rdacontent
unmediated n rdamedia
volume nc rdacarrier
Bibliog.
Includes bibliographical references (pages 231-265) and index.
Contents
Married while black -- Black house/white market -- The great un-equalizer -- The best jobs -- Legacy -- What's next.
Summary
"A groundbreaking exposé of racism in the American taxation system from a law professor and expert on tax policy. Dorothy A. Brown became a tax lawyer to get away from race. As a young black girl growing up in the South Bronx, she'd seen how racism limited the lives of her family and neighbors. Her law school classes offered a refreshing contrast: Tax law was about numbers, and the only color that mattered was green. But when Brown sat down to prepare tax returns for her parents, she found something strange: James and Dottie Brown, a plumber and a nurse, seemed to be paying an unusually high percentage of their income in taxes. When Brown became a law professor, she set out to understand why. In The Whiteness of Wealth, Brown draws on decades of cross-disciplinary research to show that tax law isn't as color-blind as she'd once believed. She takes us into her adopted city of Atlanta, introducing us to families across the economic spectrum whose stories demonstrate how American tax law rewards the preferences and practices of white people while pushing black people further behind. From attending college to getting married to buying a home, black Americans find themselves at a financial disadvantage compared to their white peers. The results are an ever-increasing wealth gap and more black families shut out of the American dream. Solving the problem will require a wholesale rethinking of America's tax code. But it will also require both black and white Americans to make different choices. This urgent, actionable book points the way forward"-- Provided by publisher.
Subject
ISBN/ISSN
9780525577324 (hardcover)
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